Review: Now You See Me 2

Christopher Nolan’s magic-based thriller The Prestige, taught me that the second act of a magician’s performance is called The Turn, where the artist sets up the trick to lead to something profound and extraordinary. I suppose one could call Now You See Me 2 a turn of sorts, but I prefer to call it a superfluous turn of events.

The Four Horsemen established themselves as the greatest magicians in the world with a feat so ingenious, they made renowned magic buster Thaddeus Bradley a patsy, they robbed their benefactor Arthur Tressler, they made the FBI look like incompetent stooges and they gave their audiences what they deserved. One year later, the horsemen emerge from hiding, only to be lured into a trap set by a man named Walter Mabry, who seeks to utilize the horsemen’s talents as thieves/magicians to steal a piece of technology capable of rendering the privacy of millions upon billions of individuals inert.

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Image by Summit Entertainment

J. Daniel Atlas, Merrick McKinney, Jack Wilder, Lula May and their mentor Dylan Rhodes are drawn into a game where if they lose, they lose everything.

I will be frank: as a fan of the original Now You See Me, I was puzzled as to why a sequel was greenlit because with the way the film ended, there was no need for one but I suppose the producers saw enough material left over from the first to build a presumed trilogy for new director Jon M. Chu and screenwriter Ed Solomon. In truth, Now You See Me 2 has plenty of slight of hand and thrills, but it was missing a very key element that made the first film so much fun: magic.

The first film focused emphasized the horsemen as magicians more than Robin Hood figures and allowed them to exercise their craft as showmen; the audience saw their tricks play out before they were broken down in detail by Bradley and reveled in the magic of the misdirect and the shifting perception. The perception certainly shifts in Now You See Me 2 but not in the way you expect.

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Image by Eva Rinaldi, via Wikimedia Commons

In this film, it felt as though the spotlight was on the horsemen’s ability as thieves more than magicians and the tricks and heists they pulled were dissected either before they did it or while they were doing it. Has Jon M. Chu ever heard of the old fable “A magician never reveals his/her secrets?” Apparently not because since the fun from the previous installment was sucked out of this excursion, Now You See Me 2 was reduced to a cheap run-of-the-mill heist thriller with a few light laughs, acceptable action, no surprise, just as amateur as a magic show performed by a 6 year-old who can’t keep his rabbit in the hat before he can pull it out. Disappointing to say the least.

Ed Solomon’s screenplay took the best of what Louis Leterrier, Boaz Yakin and Edward Ricourt built on but in the end, failed to measure up. I was satisfied with how they introduced Lizzy Caplan’s character and phased out Isla Fisher’s but Solomon and Pete Chiarelli altered the formula so much, the authenticity from the first film was lost; there was no surprise, not so much of a twist or turn, the writing had a hand in a film that simply lacked any magic left from the first movie.

While I found Now You See Me 2 poorly executed many levels, it was fun watching the cast perform in this movie. Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, Dave Franco, Lizzy Caplan, Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine, Daniel Radcliffe, all entertaining and the supporting roles of Sanaa Lathan, Jay Chou, Tsai Chin were relatively minor so it is difficult to gauge whether they made any impact at all.

I’m uncertain I can say whether any technical aspect about Now You See Me 2 left a positive impression on me. I found the cinematography of Peter Deming, the editing of Stan Salfas, the costume design of Anna B. Shepard, the production design of Sharon Seymour, very pedestrian. In some scenes, such as when Daniel Atlas controls the rain, there was a lot of visual flare that came off as very cool but, scenes such as those were far and few between.

Three years ago, I didn’t expect much from Now You See Me but the film had razzle-dazzle and I certainly enjoyed watching it. I didn’t expect much from Now You See Me 2, but I was hoping that I would have the same fun I did three years ago. I didn’t because I saw for myself that the magic was lost.

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